Sextortion

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  • Op-Ed by Karen Baker, Chief Executive Officer of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, Richard Goldinger, President of the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association, and  Legal Momentum Deputy Legal Director Jennifer M. Becker   Send me another image, or I will send what I have to your whole school . . . Send me a nude photo, or I will get you in trouble with your boss . . .
  • Op-Ed by California State Senator Connie M. Leyva and Legal Momentum Senior Staff Attorney Jennifer Becker Over the past several months, a loud national conversation has been taking place about sexual harassment and assault — in Hollywood, in business, the judiciary, and in the halls of Congress and state legislatures. The conduct revealed is not new and all stems from the same root cause — abuse of power.
  • New York, December 21, 2017 - Legal Momentum is proud to endorse Governor Cuomo’s proposal to criminalize offenses—including disclosing, or threatening to disclose, intimate or sexually explicit images or videos without consent—under state law and to require convicted perpetrators to register as sex offenders. With “Ending Sextortion Now,” the 11th proposal of the 2018 State of the State, Governor Cuomo is putting New York State at the forefront of protecting young women and girls from exploitation.
  • NEW YORK, Oct 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The torrent of stories of sexual harassment and assault in the wake of claims about Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein could help propel campaigns to make sextortion illegal, according to activists trying to change laws in the United States.Sextortion - a form of extortion that involves sexual acts or images as its currency - is not recognized by criminal laws in many U.S. states and victims often have little or no recourse, experts say.
  • Legal Momentum was invited to contribute an op-ed to The Hill on the Internet safety Modernization Act.
  • On Monday September 26, 27-year-old Kelvin Acosta of the Bronx pleaded guilty to one count of sexual exploitation of a child. Acosta used the internet to prey on young girls—one as young as 13. Acosta first made contact with his victims using Facebook, where he tricked them into revealing personal information. Using that information, he hacked his victims’ email accounts and told them he had their sex videos or nude photographs. He then told his teen victims that unless they created pornography for him or gave him money, he would send the images to their families, friends, and schools.
  • New York (July 19, 2016) — A new legal report issued by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, Legal Momentum and Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe provides an unprecedented framework for ending “sextortion,” a growing form of cyber violence aimed at teens, girls and women.
  • This report describes the problem of sextortion, highlights the gaps in the law that allow perpetrators to escape accountability, and proposes simple legislative solutions.
  • A one-page sheet of tips and guidance on how to protect yourself from being victimized by cyber-sextortion.
  • Judges demand sex in exchange for visas or favorable custody decisions, landlords threaten to evict tenants unless they have sex with them, supervisors condition job security on sex, and principals condition student graduation on sex. These are only a few faces of “sextortion.” Throughout the world, those in power extort vulnerable women and girls by demanding sex, rather than money. Victims have no choice but to comply. Noncompliance leads to life-altering and irreversible harm, such as losing one’s children, deportation, homelessness, incarceration, or unemployment.

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